What’s in the garden in March?

So what’s in the garden in March? 

At first glance it doesn’t look like much, but a closer inspection reveals a bed of parsnips ready for digging. Today I dug these beauties for supper.

I always leave my parsnips to overwinter in the dirt, where they were grown since they are at their sweetest after a winter of freezing temperatures has converted the starch into sugar. And there is no better way to bring out the sweetness than roasting them slowly to create a sweet, caramelized outer.

Caramelized parsnips

Just cut the parsnips into even bite-sized chunks. Place them in a saucepan, cover with cold water and bring to the boil. Once boiling reduce the heat and simmer for about 5 minutes. Heat a little bit of fat or oil in a roasting tin until very hot but not burning. Carefully tip the parsnips into the hot fat. Using a tablespoon coat the pieces with hot fat, to prevent them from sticking. Return the roasting tin to the oven and roast for 20 minutes. Turn the parsnips over and roast for a further 20 minutes or until the parsnips are golden brown. Serve immediately.

We shall be eating these tonight with Roast Shoulder of Pork, potatoes & carrots from our winter storage, and fresh greens from the greenhouse – not bad for March!

Advertisements

About Jane Fowler

We are working towards a sustainable lifestyle, homeschooling our children, growing all our own food and creating art. Join us in our journey, learning with us along the way.
Gallery | This entry was posted in All posts, Garden, Kitchen and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to What’s in the garden in March?

  1. Helen Opie says:

    If you still have some parsnips after digging time, eat their green tops!

    Also, just a little water (enough to not boil dry) in the bottom of the pot of parsnip chunks will steam them and is quicker as steam is hotter than water and there is less water to come to a boil, saving fuel as well as nutrients.

    Like

  2. Pingback: Parsnips under the Snow | Blueberry Hills Farm

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s